How an infinite mindset can help us navigate ongoing disruption

In his most recent book, The Infinite Game, best-selling author Simon Sinek explores how, by using finite definitions of winning, too many leaders are playing the wrong game. To adapt through continuous change, we need to think differently.

 

On 29 September, Sinek and Slalom CEO Brad Jackson will explore what it means to have long-term vision, why fostering human connection is essential to that vision, and how it can help us maintain momentum even in times of great upheaval.

 

Join us to:

  • Learn the difference between a personal “why” and an organizational Just Cause—and why we need to develop both.
  • Find out how great leaders create safe, positive environments for innovation and collaboration.
  • Redefine what it means to compete when the only competitor in the infinite game is ourselves.

This is a one-time event with no rebroadcasts. Book your 29 September time slot today!

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If you have any questions or would like additional information about the program, please reach out to slalompresents@slalom.com

Simon Sinek

"To ask, 'What's best for me?' is finite thinking. To ask, 'What's best for us?' is infinite thinking."

 

Simon Sinek is an unshakable optimist. He believes in a bright future and our ability to build it together. Described as “a visionary thinker with a rare intellect,” Sinek teaches leaders and organizations how to inspire people, foster cooperation, build trust, and affect change.

 

The author of the global bestsellers The Infinite Game, Start with Why, and Leaders Eat Last, Sinek is an ethnographer by training. Fascinated by the leaders who make an impact on the world and the companies and politicians with the capacity to inspire, Sinek's work focuses on the remarkable patterns in how such people and organizations think, act, and communicate.